NGC 3627
The spiral galaxy NGC 3627 is located about 30 million light years from Earth. This composite image includes X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue), infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red), and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope (yellow). The inset shows the central region, which contains a bright X-ray source that is likely powered by material falling onto a supermassive black hole.

A search using archival data from previous Chandra observations of a sample of 62 nearby galaxies has shown that 37 of the galaxies, including NGC 3627, contain X-ray sources in their centers. Most of these sources are likely powered by central supermassive black holes. The survey, which also used data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey, found that seven of the 37 sources are new supermassive black hole candidates.

Confirming previous Chandra results, this study finds the fraction of galaxies found to be hosting supermassive black holes is much higher than found with optical searches. This shows the ability of X-ray observations to find black holes in galaxies where relatively low-level black hole activity has either been hidden by obscuring material or washed out by the bright optical light of the galaxy.

The combined X-ray and infrared data suggest that the nuclear activity in a galaxy is not necessarily related to the amount of star-formation in the galaxy, contrary to some early claims. In contrast, these new results suggest that the mass of the supermassive black hole and the rate at which the black hole accretes matter are both greater for galaxies with greater total masses.

Credit: NASA/CXC/Ohio State Univ./C.Grier et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI, ESO/WFI; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Earth As Seen From Apollo 4 in November 1967 
from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Earth As Seen From Apollo 4 in November 1967 
from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Earth As Seen From Apollo 4 in November 1967 

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

Earth As Seen From Apollo 4 in November 1967 

NGC 7635 (Bubble Nebula), Sh2-159, NGC 7538
Credit: Emil Ivanov

The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11), is an emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. The “bubble” is created by the stellar wind from a massive central star,SAO 20575 (estimated mass 10-40 Solar masses). The adjacent giant molecular cloud contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow. Below the Bubble Nebula is the emission nebula Sharpless 159. This H II region, contains within it a very compact source of radio waves, which coincides with the densest part of the cloud, and surrounds a star of spectral type O9, which is the main source of ionization of gases in the region. At the upper left corner is another emission nebula - NGC 7538. This is one of the regions of intense star formation easier to observe, due to the fact that it is obscured by dust and dark clouds.The main source of gas ionization in this cloud is the biggest yet discovered protostar which is about 300 times the size of our Solar System.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

International Space Station Silhouetted against The Moon
[credit]

ohstarstuff:

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot 
Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS) is an atmospheric storm that has been raging in Jupiter’s southern Hemisphere for at least 400 years.
About 100 years ago, the storm covered over 40,000 km of the surface. It is currently about one half of that size and seems to be shrinking. 
At the present rate that it is shrinking it could become circular by 2040. The GRS rotates counter-clockwise(anti-cyclonic) and makes a full rotation every six Earth days. 
It is not known exactly what causes the Great Red Spot’s reddish color. The most popular theory, which is supported by laboratory experiments, holds that the color may be caused by complex organic molecules, red phosphorus, or other sulfur compounds. 
The GRS is about two to three times larger than Earth. Winds at its oval edges can reach up to 425 mph (680 km/h) 
Infrared data has indicated that the Great Red Spot is colder (and thus, higher in altitude) than most of the other clouds on the planet
Sources: http://www.universetoday.com/15163/jupiters-great-red-spot/ http://www.space.com/23708-jupiter-great-red-spot-longevity.html

ohstarstuff:

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

  • Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS) is an atmospheric storm that has been raging in Jupiter’s southern Hemisphere for at least 400 years.
  • About 100 years ago, the storm covered over 40,000 km of the surface. It is currently about one half of that size and seems to be shrinking. 
  • At the present rate that it is shrinking it could become circular by 2040. The GRS rotates counter-clockwise(anti-cyclonic) and makes a full rotation every six Earth days. 
  • It is not known exactly what causes the Great Red Spot’s reddish color. The most popular theory, which is supported by laboratory experiments, holds that the color may be caused by complex organic molecules, red phosphorus, or other sulfur compounds. 
  • The GRS is about two to three times larger than Earth. Winds at its oval edges can reach up to 425 mph (680 km/h) 
  • Infrared data has indicated that the Great Red Spot is colder (and thus, higher in altitude) than most of the other clouds on the planet

Sources:
http://www.universetoday.com/15163/jupiters-great-red-spot/ http://www.space.com/23708-jupiter-great-red-spot-longevity.html

astronomicalwonders:

Orbits of outer planets, Pluto, Sedna, and 2012 VP113
This diagram shows the positions of distant objects Sedna and 2012 VP113 with respect to those of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto on March 26, 2014. The animation tilts the solar system up and down to help visualize the positions of the distant objects with respect to the rest of the solar system. Both objects are very close to their closest-approach distances to the Sun, at approximately 80 AU, and both are located south of the ecliptic plane at a similar position.
NASA / JPL Small-Body Database Browser / animation by Emily Lakdawalla
astronomicalwonders:

Orbits of outer planets, Pluto, Sedna, and 2012 VP113
This diagram shows the positions of distant objects Sedna and 2012 VP113 with respect to those of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto on March 26, 2014. The animation tilts the solar system up and down to help visualize the positions of the distant objects with respect to the rest of the solar system. Both objects are very close to their closest-approach distances to the Sun, at approximately 80 AU, and both are located south of the ecliptic plane at a similar position.
NASA / JPL Small-Body Database Browser / animation by Emily Lakdawalla

astronomicalwonders:

Orbits of outer planets, Pluto, Sedna, and 2012 VP113

This diagram shows the positions of distant objects Sedna and 2012 VP113 with respect to those of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto on March 26, 2014. The animation tilts the solar system up and down to help visualize the positions of the distant objects with respect to the rest of the solar system. Both objects are very close to their closest-approach distances to the Sun, at approximately 80 AU, and both are located south of the ecliptic plane at a similar position.

NASA / JPL Small-Body Database Browser / animation by Emily Lakdawalla

NGC 7331 and Beyond
Image Credit & Copyright: Dietmar Hager, Torsten Grossmann

Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 7331 is often touted as an analog to our own Milky Way. About 50 million light-years distant in the northern constellation Pegasus, NGC 7331 was recognized early on as a spiral nebula and is actually one of the brighter galaxies not included in Charles Messier’s famous 18th century catalog. Since the galaxy’s disk is inclined to our line-of-sight, long telescopic exposures often result in an image that evokes a strong sense of depth. The effect is further enhanced in this sharp image by galaxies that lie beyond the gorgeous island universe. The background galaxies are about one tenth the apparent size of NGC 7331 and so lie roughly ten times farther away. Their close alignment on the sky with NGC 7331 occurs just by chance. Seen here through faint foreground dust clouds lingering above the plane of Milky Way, this visual grouping of galaxies is also known as the Deer Lick Group.

In the Heart of the Rosette Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman

In the heart of the Rosette Nebula lies a bright open cluster of stars that lights up the nebula. The stars of NGC 2244 formed from the surrounding gas only a few million years ago. The above image taken in January using multiple exposures and very specific colors of Sulfur (shaded red), Hydrogen (green), and Oxygen (blue), captures the central region in tremendous detail. A hot wind of particles streams away from the cluster stars and contributes to an already complex menagerie of gas and dust filaments while slowly evacuating the cluster center. The Rosette Nebula’s center measures about 50 light-years across, lies about 4,500 light-years away, and is visible with binoculars towards the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).

audiovision:

NASA gave Dan Winters premiere access to its space program because he has photography down to a science.
Winters meticulously set up his cameras within 700 feet of the final launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour, which is no small feat given the massive vibrations caused by the spaceward bound blasts. He also got access to iconic space memorabilia such as Neil Armstrong’s lunar suit, pictured above.
See more images from his series “Last Launch” on KPCC’s AudioVision, and, if you’re in L.A., you can see his exhibit at the Fahey/Klein Gallery from July 11th - August 31st.
audiovision:

NASA gave Dan Winters premiere access to its space program because he has photography down to a science.
Winters meticulously set up his cameras within 700 feet of the final launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour, which is no small feat given the massive vibrations caused by the spaceward bound blasts. He also got access to iconic space memorabilia such as Neil Armstrong’s lunar suit, pictured above.
See more images from his series “Last Launch” on KPCC’s AudioVision, and, if you’re in L.A., you can see his exhibit at the Fahey/Klein Gallery from July 11th - August 31st.

audiovision:

NASA gave Dan Winters premiere access to its space program because he has photography down to a science.

Winters meticulously set up his cameras within 700 feet of the final launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour, which is no small feat given the massive vibrations caused by the spaceward bound blasts. He also got access to iconic space memorabilia such as Neil Armstrong’s lunar suit, pictured above.

See more images from his series “Last Launch” on KPCC’s AudioVision, and, if you’re in L.A., you can see his exhibit at the Fahey/Klein Gallery from July 11th - August 31st.