Cone Nebula and Xmas Tree NGC2264
Credit: DeepSkyObjects Astrophotography

canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic
canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.
"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 
— bistromatic

canadiansonganon:

Some observatories and radio telescopes from around the world.

"So, these things listen to wavy radio waves from the sky; those other things look at the stars real hard." 

bistromatic

humanoidhistory:

The Moon on July 20, 1969.

(NASA)

NGC 253 Close Up

NGC 253 is one of brightest spiral galaxies in the night sky, easily visible with small telescopes, and it is composed of thousands of young, blue stars. It is undergoing intense star formation. The image demonstrates the sharp “eye” of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, which is able to show individual stars. The dark filaments are clouds of dust and gas. NGC 253 is the dominant galaxy in the Sculptor Group of galaxies and it resides about 13 million light-years from Earth.

Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Dalcanton and B. Williams (University of Washington), T.A. Rector/University of Alaska Anchorage, T. Abbott and NOAO/AURA/NSF

s-c-i-guy:

Himalayas from space

source

alanfriedman:

…A different telling of the same story.

multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 
multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.


Multiverse Of Awesomeness 

multiverseofawesomeness:

Beautiful Mars, our dead sister.

Multiverse Of Awesomeness 

Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)
Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)

Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)

ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL

ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon


Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.

Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.

Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.

The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.


Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)

Credit: NASA JPL

Happy birthday, NASA (July 29, 1958)

On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America’s activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical, that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe. It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications (source)

Cat’s Paw Nebula in Emission-Line NGC6334
Credit: DeepSkyObjects

cosmicvastness:

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2014 July 27

Rho Ophiuchi Wide Field

The clouds surrounding the star system Rho Ophiuchi compose one of the closest star forming regions. Rho Ophiuchi itself is a binary star system visible in the light-colored region on the image right. The star system, located only 400 light years away, is distinguished by its colorful surroundings, which include a red emission nebula and numerous light and dark brown dust lanes. Near the upper right of the Rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud system is the yellow star Antares, while a distant but coincidently-superposed globular cluster of stars, M4, is visible between Antares and the red emission nebula. Near the image bottom lies IC 4592, the Blue Horsehead nebula. The blue glow that surrounds the Blue Horsehead’s eye — and other stars around the image — is a reflection nebula composed of fine dust. On the above image left is a geometrically angled reflection nebula cataloged as Sharpless 1. Here, the bright star near the dust vortex creates the light of surrounding reflection nebula. Although most of these features are visible through a small telescope pointed toward the constellations of Ophiuchus, Scorpius, and Sagittarius, the only way to see the intricate details of the dust swirls, as featured above, is to use a long exposure camera.