IC443 - IC444. The Jellyfish Nebula, Supernova Remnant in Gemini

The Jellyfish nebula (IC443) in Gemini is a supernova remnant that is from 8000 years ago (3.000 - 30.000). Although it shares some characteristics with other supernova remnants like the Crab nebula, in this case, the gas threads do hot show a regular outward expansion. The nebular area on the bottom of the image is IC444. The more prominent stars are Mu and Eta Geminorum.

Credit: Antonio Perez Astronomia

adamcrossphoto:

Our galaxy doing it’s best to out-shine city lights. I really need to move somewhere darker. Oh, and our nearest galaxy neighbour Andromeda is in the second photo, see if you can spot it. It’s the smudgy looking white spot near the tree on the right hand side // adamcrossphoto
adamcrossphoto:

Our galaxy doing it’s best to out-shine city lights. I really need to move somewhere darker. Oh, and our nearest galaxy neighbour Andromeda is in the second photo, see if you can spot it. It’s the smudgy looking white spot near the tree on the right hand side // adamcrossphoto
adamcrossphoto:

Our galaxy doing it’s best to out-shine city lights. I really need to move somewhere darker. Oh, and our nearest galaxy neighbour Andromeda is in the second photo, see if you can spot it. It’s the smudgy looking white spot near the tree on the right hand side // adamcrossphoto

adamcrossphoto:

Our galaxy doing it’s best to out-shine city lights. I really need to move somewhere darker. Oh, and our nearest galaxy neighbour Andromeda is in the second photo, see if you can spot it. It’s the smudgy looking white spot near the tree on the right hand side // adamcrossphoto

beautyandtheuniverse:

The caldera at the summit of Olympus Mons on Mars, it has a depth of about 3 km.

beautyandtheuniverse:

The caldera at the summit of Olympus Mons on Mars, it has a depth of about 3 km.

spaceplasma:


On August 24th at 12:17 UT, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this M5.6-category explosion near the eastern limb of the sun.
The source of the blast was sunspot AR2151. As the movie shows, an instability in the suspot’s magnetic canopy hurled a dense plume of plasma into space. If that plasma cloud were to hit Earth, the likely result would be strong geomagnetic storms. However, because of the sunspot’s location near the edge of the solar disk, Earth was not in the line of fire.
Even so, the flare did produce some Earth effects. A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the explosion partially ionized our planet’s upper atmosphere, resulting in a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID). Waves of ionization altered the normal propagation of VLF (very low frequency) radio transmissions over the the dayside of Earth, an effect recorded at the Polarlightcenter in Lofoten, Norway: data.

Credit: NASA/SDO
spaceplasma:


On August 24th at 12:17 UT, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this M5.6-category explosion near the eastern limb of the sun.
The source of the blast was sunspot AR2151. As the movie shows, an instability in the suspot’s magnetic canopy hurled a dense plume of plasma into space. If that plasma cloud were to hit Earth, the likely result would be strong geomagnetic storms. However, because of the sunspot’s location near the edge of the solar disk, Earth was not in the line of fire.
Even so, the flare did produce some Earth effects. A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the explosion partially ionized our planet’s upper atmosphere, resulting in a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID). Waves of ionization altered the normal propagation of VLF (very low frequency) radio transmissions over the the dayside of Earth, an effect recorded at the Polarlightcenter in Lofoten, Norway: data.

Credit: NASA/SDO

spaceplasma:

On August 24th at 12:17 UT, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this M5.6-category explosion near the eastern limb of the sun.

The source of the blast was sunspot AR2151. As the movie shows, an instability in the suspot’s magnetic canopy hurled a dense plume of plasma into space. If that plasma cloud were to hit Earth, the likely result would be strong geomagnetic storms. However, because of the sunspot’s location near the edge of the solar disk, Earth was not in the line of fire.

Even so, the flare did produce some Earth effects. A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the explosion partially ionized our planet’s upper atmosphere, resulting in a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID). Waves of ionization altered the normal propagation of VLF (very low frequency) radio transmissions over the the dayside of Earth, an effect recorded at the Polarlightcenter in Lofoten, Norway: data.

Credit: NASA/SDO

UGC 1810 The Rose Galaxy

Credit: NASA/Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey
UGC 1810 The Rose Galaxy

Credit: NASA/Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey

UGC 1810 The Rose Galaxy

Credit: NASA/Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey

A message from Anonymous
Is time travel possible?

If you want to read an incredible book about that subject and many more awesome related topics check out;

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel by Michio Kaku

I read it last year along with Physics of the Future, also by Michio Kaku.

I thought it was very interesting and also very “over my head” at times. Lol. It’s been along time since I took physics class.

Thank you for the great question :)

The Carina Nebula from the ground

This image shows a ground-based view of the giant star-forming region in the southern sky known as the Carina Nebula, combining the light from three different filters tracing emission from oxygen (blue), hydrogen (green), and sulphur (red). The colour is also representative of the temperature in the ionised gas: blue is relatively hot and red is cooler. The Carina Nebula is a good example of how very massive stars rip apart the molecular clouds that give birth to them. The bright star near the centre of the image is eta Carinae, one of the most massive and luminous stars known.

Credit: N. Smith and NOAO/AURA/NSF

child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

child-of-thecosmos:

The Pale Blue Dot (Full video)

fromquarkstoquasars:

Curiosity Rover: Looking Back on the Two Years of Wear and Tear Inflicted By Mars

It’s insanely hard to believe that Curiosity has been traversing Mars for a full two years now, but, as these images show, time has certainly taken a toll on it. See before and after images of the damage: http://bit.ly/1pP0GpQ

Image Credit: NASA/JPL

flitterling:

Colorado Stars by David Kingham

Hubble/Subaru composite of star-forming region S 106

This image shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.

The image combines observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (in the centre) with images from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru Telescope to extend the field of view around the edges of the image.

Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NAOJ

A message from Anonymous
Thank you for your blogging!

Thank you so much :)

Rosette Nebula ( NGC2237-NGC2246) in Monoceros

This is a good example for one of the many star forming regions in our Milky Way. Huge clouds of gas are condensing into stars, forming clusters like NGC2244 right in the center. Its young and hot stars have already cleared the inner section, and their strong radiation exites the surrounding hydrogen and oxygen gas. The Rosette nebula is approx. 5500 light years away. If this object would be visible to the naked eye it would have the size of the full moon.

Credit: Gerhard Bachmayer