Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)
Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)

Photo sequence of Saturn: 24 February 2009

This Hubble image shows the progression of four of Saturn’s moon as they circle their parent planet. The orange moon in the image is Titan, Saturn’s largest.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Acknowledgment: M. Wong (STScI/UC Berkeley) and C. Go (Philippines)

ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon
Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL

ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers on Icy Saturn Moon


Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.

Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.

Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.

The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.


Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)

Credit: NASA JPL

Happy birthday, NASA (July 29, 1958)

On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America’s activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical, that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe. It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications (source)

Cat’s Paw Nebula in Emission-Line NGC6334
Credit: DeepSkyObjects

cosmicvastness:

NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day 2014 July 27

Rho Ophiuchi Wide Field

The clouds surrounding the star system Rho Ophiuchi compose one of the closest star forming regions. Rho Ophiuchi itself is a binary star system visible in the light-colored region on the image right. The star system, located only 400 light years away, is distinguished by its colorful surroundings, which include a red emission nebula and numerous light and dark brown dust lanes. Near the upper right of the Rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud system is the yellow star Antares, while a distant but coincidently-superposed globular cluster of stars, M4, is visible between Antares and the red emission nebula. Near the image bottom lies IC 4592, the Blue Horsehead nebula. The blue glow that surrounds the Blue Horsehead’s eye — and other stars around the image — is a reflection nebula composed of fine dust. On the above image left is a geometrically angled reflection nebula cataloged as Sharpless 1. Here, the bright star near the dust vortex creates the light of surrounding reflection nebula. Although most of these features are visible through a small telescope pointed toward the constellations of Ophiuchus, Scorpius, and Sagittarius, the only way to see the intricate details of the dust swirls, as featured above, is to use a long exposure camera.

Incredible Closeup of Horsehead Nebula by Aldo Mottino

Check out this awesome astronomy blog.

I don’t recommend blogs very often but I am really liking this one. Please Check it out and follow if you also like.

cosmicvastness

NGC 5806
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
NGC 5806
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

NGC 5806
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA


  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

  Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.
  
  "Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

Breathtaking views show the stars, Milky Way, airglow, and light pollution over New Zealand skies.

"Here are images I captured during last months from New Zealand. Great country to catch colors of airglow almost everywhere…" - Petr Horálek

Starburst galaxy NGC 1569

This image taken by NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope showcases the brilliant core of one of the most active galaxies in our local neighbourhood. The entire core is 5000 light-years wide.

The galaxy, called NGC 1569, sparkles with the light from millions of newly formed young stars. NGC 1569 is pumping out stars at a rate that is 100 times faster than the rate observed in our Milky Way Galaxy. This frenzied pace has been almost continuous for the past 100 million years.

Credit: Credit for Advanced Camera Data: NASA, ESA, A. Aloisi (STScI/ESA), J. Mack and A. Grocholski (STScI), M. Sirianni (STScI/ESA), R. van der Marel (STScI), L. Angeretti, D. Romano, and M. Tosi (INAF-OAB), and F. Annibali, L. Greggio, and E. Held (INAF-OAP)
Credit for Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Data: NASA, ESA, P. Shopbell (California Institute of Technology), R. Dufour (Rice University), D. Walter (South Carolina State University, Orangeburg), and A. Wilson (University of Maryland, College Park)


  Aurora from the plane by Paul Williams

  Aurora from the plane by Paul Williams

Aurora from the plane by Paul Williams

ohstarstuff:

Cosmic pillars of cold molecular gas and clouds of dark dust lie within Sharpless 171, a star-forming region some 3,000 light-years away in the constellation Cepheus. This false-color skyscape spans about 20 light-years across the nebula’s bright central region. Powering the nebular glow are the young, hot stars of a newly formed cluster, Berkeley 59.

(Credit & Copyright: Antonio Fernandez)

spaceplasma:

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin descending the ladder and stepping onto the Moon.  Neil Armstrong's “one small step” onto the lunar surface was actually a 3-foot jump down off the lunar module’s ladder to the ground.

Credit: NASA

spaceplasma:

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin descending the ladder and stepping onto the Moon.  Neil Armstrong's “one small step” onto the lunar surface was actually a 3-foot jump down off the lunar module’s ladder to the ground.

Credit: NASA

Water vapour plumes on Jupiter’s moon Europa (artist’s impression)

This artist’s impression shows Jupiter and its moon Europa using actual Jupiter and Europa images in visible light. The Hubble ultraviolet images showing the faint emission from the water vapour plumes have been superimposed, respecting the size but not the brightness of the plumes.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Kornmesser.
Science Credit: NASA, ESA, L. Roth (Southwest Research Institute and University of Cologne, Germany), J. Saur (University of Cologne, Germany), K. Retherford (Southwest Research Institute), D. Strobel and P. Feldman (Johns Hopkins University), M. McGrath (Marshall Space Flight Center), and F. Nimmo (University of California, Santa Cruz)