thedemon-hauntedworld:

Photo credit: NASA
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Photo credit: NASA

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Photo credit: NASA

starstuffblog:

Powerful, Pulsating Core of Star

The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar — the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse — a rotating beam of X-rays, that like a cosmic lighthouse, intersects Earth every 0.2 seconds.

The pulsar, called PSR J1640-4631, lies in our inner Milky Way galaxy about 42,000 light-years away. It was originally identified by as an intense source of gamma rays by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in Namibia. NuSTAR helped pin down the source of the gamma rays to a pulsar.

The other pink dots in this picture show low-energy X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

In this image, NuSTAR data is blue and shows high-energy X-rays with 3 to 79 kiloelectron volts; Chandra data is pink and shows X-rays with 0.5 to 10 kiloeletron volts.

The background image shows infrared light and was captured by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)

M 78
Credit: Misti Mountain Observatory

thedemon-hauntedworld:

SH2-64
Credit: Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona


Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

Stars

M42 Orion Nebula Closeup
Credit: Misti Mountain Observatory

spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.
Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO
spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.
Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO
spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.
Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO
spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.
Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO

spaceplasma:

No matter when or where you look, the Sun is always doing something interesting.

  • Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO
Yah!!!!!!!!! Thank you all so much. Love you all :)

Yah!!!!!!!!! Thank you all so much. Love you all :)

The Pinwheel Galaxy (M33)
Messier 83 is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra. It is one of the closest and brightest barred spiral galaxies in the sky, making it visible with binoculars.

Credit: Navaneeth Unnikrishnan

sixpenceee:

Volcano’s on five worlds. From left to right: Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Enceladus.